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The English Department works closely with the School’s Head of Learning Support and has forged strong links with the Library and its resources are used by staff and pupils on a regular basis.

 

In the English Department we aim to develop the language competence of all pupils through the four basic activities which comprise communication: talking, listening, reading and writing.

 

We aim to help each pupil:

  • to write with clarity, accuracy and imagination;
  • to further his/her understanding of the written word;
  • to explore and enjoy media texts and works of literature;
  • to understand the development and uses of the English Language; and
  • to talk with confidence and to listen with sensitivity.

English at Rishworth

We teach Year 7 in mixed-ability groups. Such is the range of activities, skills and understanding which is required of pupils in English lessons, that it would be unrealistic to assume a generalised level of ability across them all. Mindful of this, we use a variety of teaching strategies to cater for all ability levels in a group. Getting the best out of everyone means giving everyone a wide range of tasks, together with experience and stimulus for all kinds of reading, writing, speaking and listening.

 

In Years 8 to 11 pupils are placed into sets according to ability. At the end of the respective year movement between sets is possible and all pupils are assessed regularly to enable this to occur. There is continuity of teachers from the beginning of Year 10 until the end of Year 11 unless pupils move sets.


Lower & Middle School English

Year 7 Topics

  • Literary non-fiction: diaries, biographies and autobiographies.
  • 19th century literature: adventure and mystery.
  • 20th century poetry.
  • Time capsule.

 

Year 8 Topics

  • 19th & 21st century non-fiction.
  • Novels & short stories.
  • Persuasive writing & speeches.
  • Introduction to Shakespeare.

 

Year 9 Topics

  • Literary fiction.
  • Non-fiction.
  • Poetry: pre and post 1914.

GCSE English

Examination Board: AQA

 

Mode of Assessment: Examination

 

Course Content:

 

Examination: English Language

 

Two examinations, both worth 50% each, are taken at the end of Year 11.

 

Paper 1: Exploration in Creative Writing.

 

Section A: Reading – one literature fiction text.

Section B: Writing – descriptive or narrative writing.

 

Paper 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives.

 

Section A: Reading – one non-fiction text and one literary non-fiction text.

Section B: Writing – writing to present a point of view.

 

Plus Non-Examination Assessment:

Spoken Language

 

Examination: English Literature

 

Two examinations, the first worth 40% and the second 60%, are taken at the end of Year 11.

 

Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th-century novels.

 

Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry.

 

Examination: English

 

The decision regarding whether pupils will follow a dual entry pathway (English Language and Literature) or a single entry pathway (English) will be made at the end of Year 10 in discussion with pupils and parents.


A-Level English

The English department offers two separate, though complementary, courses at AS and A-level: English Language and English Literature.  The former encourages students to develop their understanding of the issues surrounding spoken and written language in use, and to use linguistic methods to investigate and analyse language taken from literary, media and everyday sources.  The latter encourages students to develop their interests in literature from various times and genres, and also to develop their understanding, awareness and personal responses to texts.

 

English Language

 

A-Level

 

Course content

Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society

This paper covers textual variations, textual representations and children’s language development (0-11 years).

  • written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

 

Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change

In this unit, language discourses and writing skills are assessed.

  • written examination: 2 hour 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

 

Non-exam assessment: Language in Action

Language investigation and original writing are assessed.

  • word count: 3500 words
  • 20% of A-level
  • assessed by teachers
  • moderated by the examination board

 

Examination Board: AQA

 

Mode of assessment

This is a two year A-level course, with 20% non-examined assessment and 80% examination at the end of the course.

 

English Literature

 

A-Level

 

Course content

Paper 1: Love through the Ages

Three texts are studied: one poetry and one prose text, of which one must be written pre-1900 and one must be a Shakespeare play.

  • written examination: 3 hours
  • 40% of A-level

 

Paper 2: Texts in Shared Contexts

A choice of two options is available: World War 1 and its Aftermath or Modern Times: Literature from 1945 to the Present Day.  Three texts are studied: one prose, one poetry, and one drama, of which one must be written post-2000.   The examination will include an unseen extract.

  • written examination: 2 hour 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

 

Non-exam assessment: Independent Critical Study: Texts across time.

 

Students will undertake a critical study of two texts, at least one of which must be written pre-1900, producing one extended essay and a bibliography.

  • word count: 2500 words
  • 20% of A-level
  • assessed by teachers
  • moderated by the examination board

 

Mode of assessment

This is a two year A-level course, with 20% non-examined assessment and 80% examination at the end of the course.

 

Examination Board: AQA


Outside the Classroom

The Department organises relevant theatre trips outside school and has also received several visits in school from theatre groups. We are always on the lookout for productions of set texts at GCSE and A Level as well as theatre which might interest younger pupils. For older students we organise days out to specific topic-based conferences at various locations in order to widen the scope of study.

 

We invite writers into school to work with students, encouraging reading and writing for pleasure and developing reading and writing skills. Pupils are also encouraged to enter writing competitions.

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